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dc.contributor.author최보율-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-19T05:37:52Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-19T05:37:52Z-
dc.date.issued2015-03-
dc.identifier.citationRheumatology International, v. 35, NO 2, Page. 327-336en_US
dc.identifier.issn0172-8172-
dc.identifier.issn1437-160x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1648516642?accountid=11283-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11754/23196-
dc.description.abstractCaffeine, a commonly consumed food constituent, is known to exert beneficial physiological effects in humans. There is a lack of comprehensive population data for the effects of caffeine intake on urate metabolism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether coffee, tea, and caffeine intake influences serum uric acid and the risk of hyperuricemia in the Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort. We enrolled 9,400 participants in this study. An assessment of various dietary intake amounts of substances such as coffee and tea was performed using a food frequency questionnaire. The content of caffeine was calculated from coffee (74 mg/cup) and tea (15 mg/cup) intake information from the past year. Multivariate logistic regression models, multiple linear regression models, and analysis of covariance were applied to identify any association of dietary intake with serum uric acid levels or the risk of hyperuricemia. No trends for coffee, tea, or caffeine intake were found according to each quintile with serum uric acid in males, although there were weak, marginally significant trends between the content of coffee and caffeine intake and serum uric acid level in females (p = 0.07 for both). Tea intake in males and caffeine intake in females were significantly different between non-hyperuricemia and hyperuricemia (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). In addition, a significant association of serum uric acid level with tea intake in males (beta = 0.0006, p = 0.02) and with tea intake and caffeine intake in females (beta = 0.0003, p = 0.04 and beta = 0.0006, p = 0.02, respectively) was observed. There was no effect of coffee, tea, or caffeine intake on the risk of hyperuricemia in either males or females. This study suggests that caffeine consumption might have an effect on serum uric acid in females. However, coffee, tea, and caffeine intake amounts were not associated with the risk of hyperuricemia.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by a fund (2004-E71004-00,2005-E71011-00, 2006-E71009-00, 2007-E71002-00, 2008-E71004-00, 2009- E71006-00) by Research of Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMJ PUBLISHING GROUPen_US
dc.subjectUric aciden_US
dc.subjectHyperuricemiaen_US
dc.subjectCoffeeen_US
dc.subjectTeaen_US
dc.subjectCaffeineen_US
dc.titleThe effect of coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption on serum uric acid and the risk of hyperuricemia in Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohorten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.no2-
dc.relation.volume35-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00296-014-3061-8-
dc.relation.page327-336-
dc.relation.journalANNALS OF THE RHEUMATIC DISEASES-
dc.contributor.googleauthorKim, Seong‑Kyu-
dc.contributor.googleauthorBae, Jisuk-
dc.contributor.googleauthorShin, Dong Hoon-
dc.contributor.googleauthorChun, Byung‑Yeol-
dc.contributor.googleauthorChoi, Bo Youl-
dc.contributor.googleauthorKim, Mi Kyung-
dc.contributor.googleauthorShin, Min‑Ho-
dc.contributor.googleauthorLee, Young‑Hoon-
dc.contributor.googleauthorPark, Pil Sook-
dc.relation.code2015001191-
dc.sector.campusS-
dc.sector.daehakCOLLEGE OF MEDICINE[S]-
dc.sector.departmentDEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE-
dc.identifier.pidbychoi-
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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE[S](의과대학) > MEDICINE(의학과) > Articles
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