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dc.contributor.author김성신-
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-11T01:28:48Z-
dc.date.available2022-05-11T01:28:48Z-
dc.date.issued2020-09-
dc.identifier.citationPROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, v. 117, no. 38, page. 23886-23897en_US
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424-
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.2003963117-
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.hanyang.ac.kr/handle/20.500.11754/170746-
dc.description.abstractMotor skill learning involves a complex process of generating novel movement patterns guided by evaluative feedback, such as a reward. Previous literature has suggested anteroposteriorly separated circuits in the striatum to be implicated in early goal-directed and later automatic stages of motor skill learning, respectively. However, the involvement of these circuits has not been well elucidated in human de novo motor skill learning, which requires learning arbitrary action-outcome associations and value-based action selection. To investigate this issue, we conducted a human functional MRI (fMRI) experiment in which participants learned to control a computer cursor by manipulating their right fingers. We discovered a double dissociation of fMRI activity in the anterior and posterior caudate nucleus, which was associated with performance in the early and late learning stages. Moreover, cognitive and sensorimotor cortico-caudate interactions predicted individual learning performance. Our results suggest parallel corticocaudate networks operating in different stages of human de novo motor skill learning.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Dr. Seong-Gi Kim, director of Center for Neuroscience Imaging Research (CNIR), for his scientific comments and administrative support; In-Gyu Choi and Hohyun Kang for producing the supplementary movie; Seung-Yeon Lee for her work in manual segmentation of the caudate nucleus; Hyeji Kim for assistance with the manual segmentation; Boohee Choi for her technical assistance in the MRI experiment; and Drs. Dongho Kim and Hyoung F. Kim for their scientific comments. Neuroimaging was performed at the CNIR located in Sungkyunkwan University, Korea. This work was supported by Young Science Fellowship IBS-R015-Y1 and IBS-R015-D1 from the Institute for Basic Science, Korea.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNATL ACAD SCIENCESen_US
dc.subjectde novo motor skill learningen_US
dc.subjectcaudate nucleusen_US
dc.subjectspatiotemporal dissociationen_US
dc.subjectcortico-caudate interactionsen_US
dc.subjectfMRIen_US
dc.titleSpatiotemporal dissociation of fMRI activity in the caudate nucleus underlies human de novo motor skill learningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.no38-
dc.relation.volume117-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.2003963117-
dc.relation.page23886-23897-
dc.relation.journalPROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-
dc.contributor.googleauthorChoi, Yera-
dc.contributor.googleauthorShin, Emily Yunha-
dc.contributor.googleauthorKim, Sungshin-
dc.relation.code2020053438-
dc.sector.campusS-
dc.sector.daehakCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING[S]-
dc.sector.departmentSCHOOL OF DATA SCIENCE-
dc.identifier.pidsungshinkim-
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-9500-4677-
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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING[S](공과대학) > ETC
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