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Impact of Body Size Match to an Avatar on the Body Ownership Illusion and User's Subjective Experience

Title
Impact of Body Size Match to an Avatar on the Body Ownership Illusion and User's Subjective Experience
Author
김광욱
Keywords
body ownership illusion; immersive virtual reality; body size; body motion; presence; simulator sickness
Issue Date
2020-04
Publisher
MARY ANN LIEBERT
Citation
CYBERPSYCHOLOGY BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL NETWORKING, v. 23, no. 4, page. 234-241
Abstract
The current study sought to investigate the effects of matching body movement and body size between an avatar and a participant on the body ownership illusion (BOI), the body size illusion, the sense of presence, simulator sickness, and emotional responses within an immersive virtual reality (IVR). Forty participants experienced their life-sized virtual avatars from a first-person perspective using a full-body motion-capture system. The experiment used a 2 (Motion: Synchrony and Asynchrony) × 2 (Size: Matched and Unmatched) within-subject design. Each participant completed a self-reported questionnaire that evaluated BOI, body size illusion, presence, simulator sickness, and emotional valence. Results showed that matching participant's motion to that of an avatar increased the BOI and sense of presence, while reducing simulator sickness. Furthermore, participants reported more positive emotions when motion was synchronized to the virtual avatar. Most notably, synchronizing body movement between participants and avatars resulted in strong body size illusion even when the body size of an avatar was larger than the one of a participant. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to directly link synchronization of user motion and body size to a virtual avatar with user's subjective experience (BOI, body size illusion, sense of presence, simulator sickness, and valence) in IVR. Our findings suggest beneficial effects of synchronized body motion and matched body size between a user and avatar on user's subjective experience in IVR, which can possibly boost the effects of virtual reality applications in the fields of entertainment, psychotherapy, and education.
URI
https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/cyber.2019.0136https://repository.hanyang.ac.kr/handle/20.500.11754/165793
ISSN
2152-2715; 2152-2723
DOI
10.1089/cyber.2019.0136
Appears in Collections:
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING[S](공과대학) > COMPUTER SCIENCE(컴퓨터소프트웨어학부) > Articles
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