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dc.contributor.author최영진-
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-28T06:21:45Z-
dc.date.available2021-07-28T06:21:45Z-
dc.date.issued2020-01-
dc.identifier.citationBMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, v. 21, no. 1, Page. 1-8en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2474-
dc.identifier.urihttp://eds.b.ebscohost.com/eds/detail/detail?vid=0&sid=47eb83ed-45c7-4405-9823-7feccfacddb8%40sessionmgr101&bdata=Jmxhbmc9a28mc2l0ZT1lZHMtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#AN=edsdoj.f8f7d01cc1544abb9e374841e5e128c9&db=edsdoj-
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.hanyang.ac.kr/handle/20.500.11754/163321-
dc.description.abstractBackground The purpose of this study was to investigate residual rotation of patients with forearm amputation and the contribution of involved muscle to residual rotation. Methods Testing was performed using five fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens prepared by isolating muscles involved in forearm rotation. Amputation was implemented at 25 cm (wrist disarticulation), 18 cm, or 10 cm from the tip of olecranon. Supination and pronation in the amputation stump were simulated with traction of involved muscle (supinator, biceps brachii, pronator teres, pronator quadratus) using an electric actuator. The degree of rotation was examined at 30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees, and 120 degrees in flexion of elbow. Results Average rotation of 25 cm forearm stump was 148 degrees (SD: 23.1). The rotation was decreased to 117.5 degrees (SD: 26.6) at 18 cm forearm stump. It was further decreased to 63 degrees (SD 31.5) at 10 cm forearm stump. Tendency of disorganized rotation was observed in close proximity of the amputation site to the elbow. Full residual pronation was achieved with traction of each pronator teres and pronator quadratus. Although traction of supinator could implement residual supination, the contribution of biceps brachii ranged from 4 to 88% according to the degree of flexion. Conclusions Close proximity of the amputation site to the elbow decreased the residual rotation significantly compared to residual rotation of wrist disarticulation. The preservation of pronosupination was 80% at 18 cm forearm stump. Although the pronator teres and the pronator quadratus could make a full residual pronation separately, the supinator was essential to a residual supination.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBMCen_US
dc.titleResidual rotation of forearm amputation: cadaveric studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.no1-
dc.relation.volume21-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12891-020-3050-x-
dc.relation.page1-8-
dc.relation.journalBMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS-
dc.contributor.googleauthorLee, Geon-
dc.contributor.googleauthorKim, Sung-Jae-
dc.contributor.googleauthorHa, Joo Hyung-
dc.contributor.googleauthorLee, Chang-Hun-
dc.contributor.googleauthorLee, Kwang-Hyun-
dc.contributor.googleauthorChoi, Young Jin-
dc.relation.code2020045903-
dc.sector.campusE-
dc.sector.daehakCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES[E]-
dc.sector.departmentDIVISION OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING-
dc.identifier.pidcyj-
Appears in Collections:
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES[E](공학대학) > ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING(전자공학부) > Articles
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