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dc.contributor.author김용희-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-05T05:00:13Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-05T05:00:13Z-
dc.date.issued2019-10-
dc.identifier.citationBIOMATERIALS, v. 219, article no. UNSP 119401en_US
dc.identifier.issn0142-9612-
dc.identifier.issn1878-5905-
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0142961219305009?via%3Dihub-
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.hanyang.ac.kr/handle/20.500.11754/152038-
dc.description.abstractThe tumor microenvironmental immune cells (TMICs) consists of myeloid cells (tumor-associated macrophages, dendritic cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, etc.) and lymphocytes (T cells and B cells), all of which could be immunologically suppressed through their interactions with cancer cells. Immunological understanding of the tumor microenvironment (TME) has led to great success in the development of clinical cancer immunotherapeutic. The most advanced cancer immunotherapies are chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells (CAR-T cells) and checkpoint inhibiting antibodies blocking CTLA4, PD-1 and PD-L1. However, many hurdles remain that should be addressed for improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced side effects such as cytokine release syndrome and patient-death. In recent decades, nanoparticles have been demonstrated as an efficient drug delivery tool due to their ease of modification, biocompatibility and intrinsic tumor targeting effect, and also been applied for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we briefly introduce the immunosuppressive functions of TMICs and review recent advances in the development of TMIC-targeted nanotherapeutics for cancer immunotherapy. Tumor-associated macrophage (TAM)-targeted systems have shown to deplete or re polarize macrophages to M1 state for anti-tumoral immune responses. Tumor-infiltrating T cell (TIT)-targeted strategies have provided the activation of effector T cells and suppression of regulatory T cells in tumor, overcoming the current hurdles of single regimen checkpoint inhibitors. Lastly, recent studies on dendritic cell-targeted mRNA vaccination are discussed and the future perspectives of nano-immunotherapeutic for next-generation of cancer immunotherapy is emphasized.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was partially supported by grants from the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF-2019R1A2C3008992) and Bio & Medical technology development program (NRF-2017M3A9F5029655), the Brain Korea 21 plus program (22A20130011095), and the Korean Health Technology R&D project through the Ministry of Health and Welfare (H117C0888).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCI LTDen_US
dc.subjectNano-immunotherapeuticen_US
dc.subjectTumor microenvironmental immune cells-targeted cancer immunotherapyen_US
dc.subjectTumor-associated macrophage-targeted nano-immunotherapeuticsen_US
dc.subjectTumor-infiltrating T cell-targeted nano-immunotherapeuticsen_US
dc.subjectTumor-associated dendritic cell-targeted nano-immunotherapeuticsen_US
dc.titleNon-viral nano-immunotherapeutics targeting tumor microenvironmental immune cellsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biomaterials.2019.119401-
dc.relation.page1-13-
dc.relation.journalBIOMATERIALS-
dc.contributor.googleauthorYong, Seok-Beom-
dc.contributor.googleauthorChung, Jee Young-
dc.contributor.googleauthorSong, Yoonsung-
dc.contributor.googleauthorKim, Jaehyun-
dc.contributor.googleauthorRa, Sehee-
dc.contributor.googleauthorKim, Yong-Hee-
dc.relation.code2019000362-
dc.sector.campusS-
dc.sector.daehakCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING[S]-
dc.sector.departmentDEPARTMENT OF BIOENGINEERING-
dc.identifier.pidyongheekim-
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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING[S](공과대학) > BIOENGINEERING(생명공학과) > Articles
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