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dc.contributor.author문수현-
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-10T07:13:04Z-
dc.date.available2019-12-10T07:13:04Z-
dc.date.issued2018-12-
dc.identifier.citation서양사연구, v. , no. 59, page. 45-81en_US
dc.identifier.issn1738-7027-
dc.identifier.urihttp://kiss.kstudy.com/thesis/thesis-view.asp?key=3655319-
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.hanyang.ac.kr/handle/20.500.11754/120925-
dc.description.abstractLouise Otto-Peters was widely acknowledged as the mother of the German women’s movement. She was the editor of the “FrauenZeitung”, the first political women’s newspaper in Germany, which was founded in the aftermath of the democratic revolution of 1848/49 and the founder of “Allgemeiner Deutscher Frauenverein”, the first “German” women’s rights association. Germany in the second half of the 19th century was pretty much a conservative society. Hence, her campaigns were under serious surveillance. The government of the federal state of Germany, Sachsen which was her home state, issued “Lex Otto” which prohibited women from being the editors of newspaperssince it was concerned that Louise OttoPeters would mobilize the women against the government. As a result, the “Frauen-Zeitung” was relatively short-lived: it had been published only between 1849~1951. She restarted her campaigns by organizing the “Allgemeiner Deutscher Frauenverein” in 1865. Her association did not turn into true suffrage, but focused on female education and increasing job opportunities for women. Louise OttoPeters grounded her feminist cause on the women’s difference from males, in other words, the maternity.Her relational approach, rather than individualist one, was widely viewed or even criticized as the symbol of the passivity of German feminism. However, it was not uncommon that feminists grounded their campaigns not only on the individual’s rights and personal autonomy but also equality-in-difference, and many sought entitlement as citizens in terms of sexual difference. In that sense, Otto’s feminism cannot be dismissed simply as a deviation from the “right” course of feminism. Although many feminist activists of the first generation firmly believed that their suffrage should be the first step or gateway to the achievement of the genuine feminist goals, it turned out that there could not be one decisive solution on the way to achieving gender equality. Against this backdrop, we can say that Louise Otto’s relational and gradualist approach to the gender equality mattered just as much.en_US
dc.language.isoko_KRen_US
dc.publisher한국서양사연구회en_US
dc.subject여성신문en_US
dc.subject독일여성총연합en_US
dc.subject독일 페미니즘en_US
dc.subject오토법en_US
dc.subject1848/49en_US
dc.subjectFrauenzeitungen_US
dc.subjectAllgemeiner Deutscher Frauenvereinen_US
dc.subjectGerman Feminismen_US
dc.subjectLex Ottoen_US
dc.subject1848/49en_US
dc.title독일 여성운동의 시원, 루이제 오토en_US
dc.title.alternativeLouise Otto-Peters on the Threshold of the German Feminist Movementen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.no59-
dc.identifier.doi10.16894/JOWH.59.2-
dc.relation.page45-81-
dc.relation.journal서양사연구-
dc.contributor.googleauthor문수현-
dc.contributor.googleauthorMoon, Soo Hyun-
dc.relation.code2018018118-
dc.sector.campusS-
dc.sector.daehakCOLLEGE OF HUMANITIES[S]-
dc.sector.departmentDEPARTMENT OF HISTORY-
dc.identifier.pidmunshyun-
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COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES[S](인문과학대학) > HISTORY(사학과) > Articles
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