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Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks increases the risk of hyperuricemia in Korean population: The Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort Study

Title
Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks increases the risk of hyperuricemia in Korean population: The Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort Study
Author
최보율
Keywords
SERUM URIC-ACID; NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY; 3RD NATIONAL-HEALTH; METABOLIC SYNDROME; KIDNEY-DISEASE; FRUCTOSE; GOUT; LEVEL; WOMEN; MEN
Issue Date
2014-04
Publisher
W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, 1600 JOHN F KENNEDY BOULEVARD, STE 1800, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19103-2899 USA
Citation
Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism , Vol.43 No.5 [2014] , 654-661
Abstract
Objective: The clinical implication of sugar-sweetened soft drinks on the risk of hyperuricemia has increased, especially in Western population studies. The aim of this study is to clarify the association between sugar-sweetened soft drinks and fruit drinks made from oranges and apples and the risk of hyperuricemia in the Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort. Methods: A total of 9400 subjects were enrolled in the Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort Study, and a cross-sectional analysis was performed. Five quintiles (Q1-Q5) according to consumption of soft drinks and other fruit/fruit juices were classified and then categorized into three groups (Q1-Q3, Q4, and Q5) to assess the risk of hyperuricemia. Information on dietary intake was collected by well-trained interviewers using validated food frequency questionnaires. Results: Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks (Q5) increased the risk of hyperuricemia in males (adjusted OR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.07-1.71) with a linear trend (p for trend = 0.01) and in females (adjusted OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.03-1.90) with no linear trend (p for trend = 0.09), compared to lower consumption (Q1-Q3). However, there were no significant differences of serum uric acid level according to the three categories of soft drink consumption, Q1-Q3, Q3, and Q5, in males (p = 0.21) or in females (p = 0.16), whereas all subjects showed statistical significance of serum uric acid level within the categories (p < 0.001). Estimated amount of soft drink intake was associated with serum uric acid level in males (beta = 0.001; p = 0.01) but not in females (beta = 0.0005; p = 0.10). Conclusion: Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks increased the risk of hyperuricemia in the Korean population, showing a differential linear trend for hyperuricemia according to gender. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
URI
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004901721300214Xhttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11754/51304
ISSN
0049-0172; 1532-866X
DOI
10.1016/j.semarthrit.2013.10.008
Appears in Collections:
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE[S](의과대학) > ETC
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