The effect of coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption on serum uric acid and the risk of hyperuricemia in Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort

Title
The effect of coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption on serum uric acid and the risk of hyperuricemia in Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort
Authors
김미경
Keywords
Uric acid; Hyperuricemia; Coffee; Tea; Caffeine
Issue Date
2015-03
Publisher
SPRINGER HEIDELBERG
Citation
RHEUMATOLOGY INTERNATIONAL, v. 35, NO 2, Page. 327-336
Abstract
Caffeine, a commonly consumed food constituent, is known to exert beneficial physiological effects in humans. There is a lack of comprehensive population data for the effects of caffeine intake on urate metabolism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether coffee, tea, and caffeine intake influences serum uric acid and the risk of hyperuricemia in the Korean Multi-Rural Communities Cohort. We enrolled 9,400 participants in this study. An assessment of various dietary intake amounts of substances such as coffee and tea was performed using a food frequency questionnaire. The content of caffeine was calculated from coffee (74 mg/cup) and tea (15 mg/cup) intake information from the past year. Multivariate logistic regression models, multiple linear regression models, and analysis of covariance were applied to identify any association of dietary intake with serum uric acid levels or the risk of hyperuricemia. No trends for coffee, tea, or caffeine intake were found according to each quintile with serum uric acid in males, although there were weak, marginally significant trends between the content of coffee and caffeine intake and serum uric acid level in females (p = 0.07 for both). Tea intake in males and caffeine intake in females were significantly different between non-hyperuricemia and hyperuricemia (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). In addition, a significant association of serum uric acid level with tea intake in males (beta = 0.0006, p = 0.02) and with tea intake and caffeine intake in females (beta = 0.0003, p = 0.04 and beta = 0.0006, p = 0.02, respectively) was observed. There was no effect of coffee, tea, or caffeine intake on the risk of hyperuricemia in either males or females. This study suggests that caffeine consumption might have an effect on serum uric acid in females. However, coffee, tea, and caffeine intake amounts were not associated with the risk of hyperuricemia.
URI
http://search.proquest.com/docview/1648516642?accountid=11283http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11754/23238
ISSN
0172-8172; 1437-160X
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-014-3061-8
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COLLEGE OF MEDICINE[S](의과대학) > MEDICINE(의학과) > Articles
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