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High reproduction number of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in nosocomial outbreaks: mathematical modelling in Saudi Arabia and South Korea

Title
High reproduction number of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in nosocomial outbreaks: mathematical modelling in Saudi Arabia and South Korea
Author
최보율
Keywords
Nosocomial infection; Basic reproduction number; Epidemiology; Middle east respiratory; syndrome coronavirus; Mathematical modelling; South Korea
Issue Date
2018-06
Publisher
W B SAUNDERS CO LTD
Citation
JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL INFECTION, v. 99, no. 2, page. 162-168
Abstract
Background: Effective countermeasures against emerging infectious diseases require an understanding of transmission rate and basic reproduction number (R-0). R-0 for severe acute respiratory syndrome is generally considered to be >1, whereas that for Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is considered to be <1. However, this does not explain the large-scale outbreaks of MERS that occurred in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and South Korean hospitals.Aim: To estimate R-0 in nosocomial outbreaks of MERS.Methods: R-0 was estimated using the incidence decay with an exponential adjustment model. The KSA and Korean outbreaks were compared using a line listing of MERS cases compiled using publicly available sources. Serial intervals to estimate R-0 were assumed to be six to eight days. Study parameters [R-0 and countermeasures (d)] were estimated by fitting a model to the cumulative incidence epidemic curves using Matlab.Findings: The estimated R-0 in Korea was 3.9 in the best-fit model, with a serial interval of six days. The first outbreak cluster in a hospital in Pyeongtaek had an R-0 of 4.04, and the largest outbreak cluster in a hospital in Samsung had an R-0 of 5.0. Assuming a six-day serial interval, the KSA outbreaks in Jeddah and Riyadh had R-0 values of 3.9 and 1.9, respectively.Conclusion: R-0 for the nosocomial MERS outbreaks in KSA and South Korea was estimated to be in the range of 2-5, which is significantly higher than the previous estimate of <1. Therefore, more comprehensive countermeasures are needed to address these infections.
URI
https://www.journalofhospitalinfection.com/article/S0195-6701(17)30526-1/fulltexthttp://repository.hanyang.ac.kr/handle/20.500.11754/119012
ISSN
0195-6701; 1532-2939
DOI
10.1002/adfm.201800511
Appears in Collections:
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE[S](의과대학) > MEDICINE(의학과) > Articles
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