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Predicting factors for shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

Title
Predicting factors for shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage
Author
김동원
Keywords
Hydrocephalus; Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage; Fever; Infection
Issue Date
2018-05
Publisher
SPRINGER WIEN
Citation
ACTA NEUROCHIRURGICA, v. 160, no. 7, page. 1407-1413
Abstract
Chronic hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a major complication that leads to a medical burden and poor clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive factors of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus focusing on postoperative fever and infection.A total of 418 patients were included in this study and the patient demographic features, radiologic findings, days of fever burden, and infection were compared between the shunt (n = 72) and no shunt group (n = 346). Days of fever burden was defined as the total number of days with the highest body temperature <= 38.0 A degrees C each day from day 1 to day 14. Pneumonia, urinary tract infection (UTI), meningitis, and bacteremia were recorded in all patients.The independent predictive factors for shunt-dependent hydrocephalus were older age <= 65, microsurgical clipping, placement of extraventricular drainage (EVD), days of fever burden, and infection. The incidence of shunt dependency was 2.4% in the no fever burden patients (n = 123), 14.9% in the 1-3 days of fever burden patients (n = 161), 27.0% in the 4-6 days of fever burden patients (n = 74), and 41.7% in the <= 7 days of fever burden patients with statistical significance among groups (p < 0.001).The rate of shunt dependency increased proportionally as the days of fever burden increased. Older age (<= 65), microsurgical clipping, placement of EVD, days of fever burden, and infection were independent predictive factors for shunt dependency. Proper postoperative care for maintaining normal body temperature and preventing infectious disease can help reduce the rate of shunt dependency and improve clinical outcomes.
URI
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00701-018-3560-6http://repository.hanyang.ac.kr/handle/20.500.11754/118639
ISSN
0001-6268; 0942-0940
DOI
10.1007/s00701-018-3560-6
Appears in Collections:
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE[S](의과대학) > MEDICINE(의학과) > Articles
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